Spring on the Farm

Standard

We start our Animals on the Farm unit with Flip the Flaps: Farm Animals by Karen Wallace and Baby Animals on the Farm by Bendon Publishing. By pairing the books. children got a strong overview of the unit and its vocabulary. The Flip the Flaps book covered interesting facts, giving each animal a two page spread and a question that is answered by lifting the flap. The students looked forward to remembering what was under the flap. Baby Animals on the farm gave names to male and female adult animals as well as the baby animals – a great vocabulary booster. The book Seasons on the Farm also tied this unit to last weeks intro to spring and review of the four seasons.

I have plenty of farm animal toys – a Fisher Price barn and animals, See and Say animal noises, farm animal puzzles, and Leap Frog Farm Animals Mash Up, to name a few. Whenever students play at centers, I can interact with them and encourage the vocabulary terms we have learned.

One day we read Wake Up, Sun by David Harrison and Rock-A-Bye Farm by by Diane Johnston Hamm. These books review animal sounds and names. We made a list of all the jobs on the farm from sunup to sundown. It was great to hear them consider this list when playing with the farm animals.

One day we discussed the commercial use of each animal. These are covered in the Flip the Flap Animal book – sheep give wool, cows give milk, chickens lay eggs, etc. As an extension of the children’s understanding of dairy cows, we made this flower petal foldable and discussed dairy products.

What can you make from milk? These are all dairy products: ice cream. butter, milk, yogurt, sour cream.

What can you make from milk? These are all dairy products: ice cream. butter, milk, yogurt, sour cream and cheese.

Students heard Punk Farm by Jarrett J. Krosoczka and Click Clack Moo, Cows that Type by Doreen Cronin this week.  Both of these are rather imaginative fanciful books about what animals and farmers do. This lead back to our discussion of the role the farmer and animals actually have on the farm.

 

The farm animal unit has marvelous activities and artwork!

The children's horses turned out so well. Children were given the horse head outline and were encouraged to paint their horse any color they wanted. The next day we added a yarn mane and an eye. These horses look like they are galloping fast.

The children’s horses turned out so well. Children were given the horse head outline and were encouraged to paint their horse any color they wanted. The next day we added a yarn mane and an eye. These horses look like they are galloping fast.

I found this barn and selection of animals on a website. You can find it here. http://buggyandbuddy.com/peek-a-boo-farm-animals-activity-free-printable/ Some children put ALL the animals in the barn, others put them all outside. some drew extra details like a lake and a fence.

I found this barn and selection of animals on a website. You can find it here. http://buggyandbuddy.com/peek-a-boo-farm-animals-activity-free-printable/ Some children put ALL the animals in the barn, others put them all outside. some drew extra details like a lake and a fence.

One of my favorites! The "cows in the corn" tie back to the Little Boy Blue nursery rhyme in the class book we made of nursery rhymes with our pictures in it! Love it! Students painted a small paper plate light brown and assembled the cow from precut pieces the next day. While we were painting, we used Q-tips to dot our yellow corn cobs with yellow. We glued the leaves on the next day.

One of my favorites! The “cows in the corn” tie back to the Little Boy Blue nursery rhyme in the class book we made of nursery rhymes with our pictures in it! Love it! Students painted a small paper plate light brown and assembled the cow from pre-cut pieces the next day. While we were painting, we used Q-tips to dot our yellow corn cobs with yellow. We glued the leaves on the next day.

More farm animal fun! Knowing how much parents love hand prints, this is a project I had to do, and the students loved it. I used the large 12x18" white construction paper. At the top you see an egg on some straw. Next you see a chick pecking through the shell with her egg tooth on her beak. This is called pipping. Next we see the chick, and then we have the chicken or rooster. We learned all about eggs in our Scholastic Big Book Magazine on Eggs.

More farm animal fun! Knowing how much parents love hand prints, this is a project I had to do, and the students loved it. I used the large 12×18″ white construction paper. At the top you see an egg on some straw. Next you see a chick pecking through the shell with her egg tooth on her beak. This is called pipping. Next we see the chick, and then we have the chicken or rooster. We learned all about eggs in our Scholastic Big Book Magazine on Eggs.

I pre-cut the pieces and helped get the hand print correct. The students did the rest!

 

 

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